DIRECT BUS SERVICE

Article themes

article archives

June 2017
Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa Su
29 30 31 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
Written by: Michael Barbic
Date: 2011/07/23

The enormous Typhoon No. 6 approaching Japan was the main topic of news last week. And when it finally hit, it left record-breaking rainfall, floods, landslides, and destruction in its wake. Although places like Shikoku got hit with over 1 meter of rain, here in Kamikōchi, we barely knew it was a typhoon. 

The Blue Sky of Summer

 

With the typhoon making a 90 degree turn out to sea just before hitting Nagano Prefecture, here we were spared the heavy rain and wind that pounded down on western Japan for days. It did rain in Kamikōchi, but not so much that you would think it was any more than a regular sprinkle. The lifting of the rain and parting of the clouds gave way to the summer sun, and here we can see the brilliant and soothing blue of the Azusa-gawa River in full light.

The Azusa-gawa River Undisturbed by the Typhoon

Although clouds blocked the tops of the Hotaka Mountains from view, Mt. Yakedake stood proud amongst the clouds with its peak visible to all. While not nearly as majestic as seeing the peaks themselves, visitors should also take some time to look upon the deep green summer foliage of the mountains here. With this area of Japan being blessed with so much precipitation, the green is truly worth seeing.

Mt. Yakedake on a Typical Summer Day

As dangerous as it might seem to some, being surrounded by mountains during a typhoon is not the most dangerous place to be. I actually feel quite safe. I'll take my chances in Kamikōchi anytime over a trip near the sea. What can I say, I was born to be in the mountains. And, I know I'm not alone. How about you?

 

Source of Information:

- Kamikōchi National Park Guide Website (http://npg-alps.net/)